NSCAC NEWSLETTER: November 2018

February 13, 2019

 

NOVEMBER 2018:

In this edition of our NSCAC Newsletter, we're featuring articles from our President Tony Waiters, former Head Coach of the Canadian Men's National Soccer Team, and Richard Bucciarelli, our Director of Sports Science, as well as a video of the training session run by Valerio Rocca, one of our Regional Directors, from our recent Youth Development Clinic in September of this year.

 

NSCAC Members can view the full article and videos in our Member's section.

 

Members can click on the links below to read the articles/watch the videos, and non-Members can visit www.nscac.ca

 

President's Message:

 

Will the effects of heading a soccer ball change soccer as we know it today?

 

(By Tony Waiters)

Many parents encourage their children to play soccer, since it is considered a non-contact sport and seems safe. But now, the latest research from neuropathologists at the University College London casts doubt on that assumption. Their work offers compelling evidence that soccer heading produces progressive brain damage and leads to heartbreaking dementia later in life.

 

The study at the University College London further confirms what earlier research has shown.

The researchers studied 14 retired soccer players who died having been diagnosed with dementia, and 12 out of 14 of them had advanced dementia. Their neurological symptoms began in midlife, only 15-20 years following their retirement from play.

 

The researchers obtained permission to study the brains of six players. Under the microscope, all six brains showed evidence of the abnormal tau protein accumulation typical of Alzheimer's dementia, and four of the six brains revealed the classic damage associated with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more...

 

The rest of the article can be found in our "Members Only Section". Become a member now to get exclusive content and discounts.

 

Why Coaches in High Performance Programs Shouldn't Select Slow Players

(by Richard Bucciarelli)

 

The use of standardized, objective methods of player assessment minimizes – and in some case eliminates – the influence of coaching bias which can occur as a result of subjective, opinion-based analysis. 

In the book ‘The Sports Gene’ by David Epstien (which should be required reading for any fitness coach working with athletes, including soccer players) the value of objective analysis is clearly apparent. 

According to Epstein, one objective fact that is of specific importance in sports including soccer, is that speed – and in particular an athlete’s percentage of fast-twitch muscle fibres, which are responsible for increased speed – is an excellent predictor of performance.

Simply put, this means that players at higher levels of play (professional and National Team soccer, for example) are faster, and have better recovery abilities, than players at lower levels of play (amateur and recreational soccer).

 

Below is an excerpt from one of the few instances in which Epstein discusses soccer in The Sports Gene, including quotes from Danish fitness expert, and fitness coach for Copenhagen F.C. in the Danish First Division, Jesper Andersen:

 

Read more... The rest of the article can be found in our "Members Only Section". Become a member now to get exclusive content and discounts.

 

Age-Appropriate Technical Skills Training - by Valerio Rocca 

(Check out the first phase of the session)

 

To watch entire session, Click here to become a Member of the NSCAC!

 

 

NEW ON OUR WEBSITE: WE HAVE NOW ADDED FRENCH-LANGUAGE REGISTRATION FORM! CLICK HERE TO CHECK IT OUT!

 

**IF YOU'RE INTERESTED IN VIEWING OUR SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER 2018 NEWSLETTERS, THEY ARE NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE HOMEPAGE AT www.nscac.ca.

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